Occupying the Collective Space

by Dr. Katrin Muff

Different ways of occupying…

As we will consider in this month’s blog, there are different ways of occupying that middle ground between the personal space each of us feel responsible for, and societal best interests. The collective space called “we” can be used to uplift individuals to act together for a better common future, or it can be hijacked by individuals or special interest groups to occupy or “blockupy” the collective space pressing their issues – for better, or worse, as we shall see below, and not necessarily in the interest of the greater common good.

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Moving From “I” to “We”

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by Dr. Kathy Miller Perkins

For in the final analysis, our most basic common link is that we all inhabit this small planet. We all breathe the same air. We all cherish our children’s futures. And we are all mortal.

John F. Kennedy 

Recap – January Blog

Last month Katrin discussed the “zero decade” – a term used by Naomi Klein to describe our dwindling opportunity to take action to keep human-created climate change in check.  Katrin conveyed how we might avoid an unmitigated global disaster.  She outlined three levels of global responsibility including the individual (I), the collective (we) and the societal (us).  She suggested focusing on how we might effectively occupy that middle space– the “we”.

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Book Review – Thinking the Twenty-First Century: Ideas for the New Political Economy

Thinking the Twenty-First Century is a magnificent, unruly, exuberant book.” – Richard Little

Tony Judt, in the valedictory conversations with Timothy Snyder whose title is echoed in this book, said that the task of the public intellectual in the face of growing global insecurities would no longer be ‘to imagine better worlds but rather to think how to prevent worse ones’. There is no way out, ‘the fully enlightened earth radiates disaster triumphant’ and it is all we can hope for that a handful will survive to start again.

And yet – both books, by their very existence, suggest the contrary – that, in extremis, it is faith in a better world in a distant and unknowable future that validates a life – that there is no reason to suppose that there is a shortage of better worlds to come.

Of course, some of those better worlds may not feature Facebook and buttered crumpets. It remains to be seen whether we will be dragged screaming and kicking to a sustainable economy by an angry earth, or achieve it through reason and collaboration. This book is all for the latter and offers us a comprehensive a guide to the ideas that will help us do it. Continue reading

The “Zero Decade” and the Zero-Impact Feeling

NOTE: This post by Dr Katrin Muff is a continuation of ‘The Transatlantic Debate Blog, a series of articles published in 2014 forming a conversation between Katrin Muff and Kathy Miller Perkins on business sustainability. For more information and to read the posts, please click here.

Activists have come to call our current decade the “zero decade” – the decade in which we have the power to decide if we take action to keep human-made global warming within the relatively safe two degrees, or if we let the climate head off into spheres where the only certainty is that life will dramatically change for the generations after us. Is there anything we can do? Is there anything I can do?

I recently spent 40 hours on a train across India and took the time to read Naomi Klein’s This Changes Everything book on climate change and what it will take for us to remain within the required two-degree temperature limit. Well, nothing short of getting rid of the capitalist system as we have come to know it! How? Nothing short of a revolution and global social unrest, she says. I don’t like social unrest – for many reasons – and I am sure I am not alone. The alternative? What if there is none?

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Greenleaf Online Library Now Available in Ethiopia and Mozambique

Greenleaf and GSE

 

 

 

GSE Research and Greenleaf Publishing is bringing its Greenleaf Online Library (GOL) collection to Ethiopia and Mozambique for the first time.

The resource is being made available to the universities, research institutions and governments of each country through the publisher’s partnership with INASP; an international development charity that works to improve access, production and use of research information and knowledge, so that countries are equipped to solve their development challenges.

GOL covers topics including sustainability, responsible business, business ethics, corporate governance, development economics and environmental management. The latest version of the collection contains more than 4,000 individually tagged chapters, articles, case studies and reports drawn from nearly 300 books and journal issues, published by independent specialist Greenleaf Publishing and partners including the UN Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME), UN Global Compact and Geneva Association.

Director John Peters said: ‘We’re delighted to be working in partnership with INASP to make our content more widely available in developing countries. It was one of the reasons I wanted to start this business, and make it a success. We are trying to make the world a bit better by what we do.’

For more information about GSE Research and Greenleaf Publishing, please visit www.gseresearch.com.

To find out more about INASP, please see www.inasp.info.

 

 

GUEST BLOG: Cabell’s New Inclusion Criteria

by Cabell’s Publishing

Cabell's Directories Logo

In the last few years, the issue of fraudulent or deceptive journals in academic publishing has readily and repeatedly come to forefront of our community’s concerns and discussions. With the continued development of the open access movement and the proliferation of those who seek to abuse the spirit of the cause, the academic community had to re-evaluate itself.  Throughout this introspection, certain voices in the community, some of which manifested as things like Beall’s list or the Bohannon sting, caution that the prevalence of predatory publishing, particularly in open access, is potentially more serious than most ever imagined.

We at Cabell’s, in seeking to help our users navigate the publishing landscape and find success in the publishing community, are mindful of these concerns. Above all, we want to ensure that our users find helpful and accurate information and to direct our users to reputable outlets for publication. We, in this pursuit, entered into our own self-assessment and have since launched a reevaluation initiative.

This initiative, taking cues from the community and acting with redoubled vigor, necessitates the complete reapplication and fresh examination of questioned open-access listings using more stringent inclusion standards and criteria.  The revised standards, which can be viewed in full as a Word document here, include both determinative and suggestive criteria, both positive and negative. In short, this means that because there is no universally accepted per se definition of a predatory publication, we consider qualities that are demonstrative of quality against those that are potentially indicative of abuse.

Because we will only be satisfied by giving our users reliable and trustworthy results, our process is predisposed to stringency, only including results that we can confidently recommend to our users. As such, a journal that is removed from our listings is not necessarily predatory or unethical. Rather, this indicates that the journal has not yet demonstrated clear and conspicuous reputability to our Journals Admissions Department through either the reapplication or the appeals/reform process.

We thank our users and everyone involved for their patience, knowing that this procedure is ensuring them a reliable way to navigate these difficulties in the publishing experience.

Click here to go to our website’s information about this transition.

For more information, use the live chat feature at www.cabells.com, or ask via email at info@cabells.com.

For appeals inquiries, contact the Journals Admissions Department at appeals@cabells.com

Call for Papers: A Special Issue of The Journal of Corporate Citizenship on Intellectual Shamans, Wayfinders, Systems Thinkers and Social Movements

JCC 48 coverCall for Papers

The Journal of Corporate Citizenship Special Issue

Intellectual Shamans, Wayfinders, Systems Thinkers and Social Movements:  Building a Future Where All Can Thrive

Guest Editors: Chellie Spiller (Lead Editor), Malcolm McIntosh, Judith Neal, Edwina Pio, Sandra Waddock 

How will we build a future where all can thrive?  That is a question that has always haunted people.  Today, however, we face a particular need for radical global systems change. A key issue is the rampant fundamentalism of neoliberal economics which claims that the market will solve the challenges of climate change, species extinction, inequity, a troubled global financial system, misogyny, nationalism and social unrest.  It will not. The neoliberal endeavor to objectify, commoditise and marketise all aspects of our lives has devalued public goods, social enterprise, quiet moments, awe and wonder from daily living. Continue reading