Greenleaf at 21: “I think we are just getting started”

Namestyle_21Welcome to the Greenleaf at 21 blog series. To celebrate our 21st birthday, over the next few months we will be sharing original posts by influential Greenleaf authors, in which they discuss how their field has changed over the last 21 years and what they hope to see change in the future.

We’re kicking off this week with an exclusive interview with Deborah Leipziger, author of The Corporate Responsibility Code Book, the groundbreaking guide that brought much-needed order to CR frameworks and is now an invaluable reference for companies trying to understand the landscape of Corporate Responsibility. As if this wasn’t enough, game-changer Deborah helped create the SA8000 standard which is now widely used by the apparel industry. In this interview she shares her thoughts on how far CR has come, and how far it still has to go.

How do you feel CR has advanced since the publication of the influential Code Book?

Corporate Responsibility has evolved in significant ways and at the same time, it is still in its infancy. After working in this field for more than two decades, I see a growing interest in social innovation and social value creation.

Social entrepreneurs are making strides to address problems such as poverty, hunger and gender inequality. Social intrapreneurs, or entrepreneurs on the inside of companies, are addressing social and environmental problems.
Continue reading

“It’s no good just putting a triangular logo on something… we need to educate consumers”

In the the fifth video of the interview series with contributors to Cranfield on Corporate Sustainability, editor David Grayson talks to Lynette Ryals, Professor of Strategic Sales & Account Management at Cranfield School of Management about her chapter in the book Cranfield on Corporate Sustainability which looks at the issues in sustainable marketing. Follow the discussion here:


Continue reading

“Each business coalition needs to look to its future… is it fit for the future, and can it play a bigger role in tackling sustainable consumption?”

An exclusive preview of the content of David Grayson and Jane Nelson’s new book Corporate Responsibility Coalitions: The Past, Present, and Future of Alliances for Sustainable Capitalism.

Continue reading

“The thing about sustainability is, people can see it coming… the question is, will they plan for it?”

In the the fourth video of the interview series with contributors to Cranfield on Corporate Sustainability, editor David Grayson talks to Mike Bourne, Professor of Business Performance at Cranfield School of Management about his chapter in the book “Cranfield on Corporate Sustainability” on how to deal with sustainability in terms of business performance. Follow the discussion here:

Continue reading

“It’s not a good idea to separate competition and responsibility… we need to reconcile them”

In the the third video of the interview series with contributors to Cranfield on Corporate Sustainability, editor David Grayson talks to Patrick Reinmoeller, Professor of Strategic Management at Cranfield School of Management about his chapter in the book on embedding sustainability into a corporate strategy. Follow the discussion here:

Continue reading

The Map of Meaning: reconnecting us with what is vital in our lives

Elvan Turak (left), participant in the masterclass on the Map of Meaning, with co-author Lani Morris, at the launch of The Map of Meaning in Brisbane.

Elvan Turak (left), participant in the masterclass on the Map of Meaning, with co-author Lani Morris, at the launch of The Map of Meaning in Brisbane.

In these times of austerity and misery it seems incredible that a book could make you less upset about losing your job, or bring you round to the idea that things may never again be the same as before the global financial crisis. However, The Map of Meaning is not only an engaging read, it also gives you the tools to restructure how you connect with what is important in life. Co-author Lani Morris launched the book in Australia this month, and she gives us a short account of how the book can shed light on seemingly hopeless situations:

“Kerry McGovern and Associates brought me over to Brisbane to do a masterclass on the Map of Meaning and we decided to launch the book to coincide with the River of Fire which ends the Brisbane Festival. So, in the borrowed light of fireworks, we launched the book in Australia.

Despite the fireworks, given that 14,000 civil servants in Queensland had just been made redundant, the mood was stunned, angry and despairing at times.
Continue reading

Sparking Change: 6 Ways to Work in CSR & Express Your Values at Work

Tim Mohin, Director of Corporate Responsibility at AMD

Tim Mohin, Director of Corporate Responsibility, AMD

How can you weave CSR and/or sustainability into your current responsibilities, whether you work in supply chain, HR, facilities, marketing, finance or operations? Tim Mohin has the answers.

In the book, you say: “Any person at any level can be the spark that ignites the next great corporate responsibility programme.” How can you engage employees from ground up, and what kind of platform can you provide them so they can confidently contribute ideas in corporate responsibility?

I use the phrase “lead from wherever you stand” in the book to communicate the notion that anyone at any level can have an impact on corporate responsibility. When you step back and think about the “lead from where you stand” paradigm, it has implications beyond CSR. All great leaders started out in lower level jobs and learned how to demonstrate their leadership potential from these roles.
Continue reading

How is CSR Funded and Connected to the Corporate Brand?

Patagonia’s “Don’t Buy This Jacket” ad is brand CSR at its strongest


Because of an enthusiastic response to a recent news release introducing his book Changing Business from the Inside Out: A Treehugger’s Guide to Working in Corporations – with multiple queries coming in and shares across social media channels – Tim Mohin has agreed to answer some questions he received from CSRwire readers and the students of the Applied Corporate Responsibility Class at Harvard University, one of the first cohorts to read the book, in a blog series on Talkback.
Continue reading

As a CSR professional, are you driving yourself out of a job?

Tim Mohin, Director of Corporate Responsibility at AMD

Tim Mohin, Director of Corporate Responsibility, AMD

Because of an enthusiastic response to a recent news release introducing his book Changing Business from the Inside Out: A Treehugger’s Guide to Working in Corporations – with multiple queries coming in and shares across social media channels – Tim Mohin has agreed to answer some questions he received from CSRwire readers and the students of the Applied Corporate Responsibility Class at Harvard University, one of the first cohorts to read the book, in a blog series on Talkback.
Continue reading