Capitalism with a Human Face – A 2015 Update

Globalization & CC

To celebrate the publication of Globalization and Corporate Citizenship: The Alternative Gaze  (Edited by Malcolm McIntosh) we wanted to share Klaus M. Leisinger’s reflective update to his seminal article from 2007: Capitalism with a Human Face. Continue reading

Complexity, Collapse and Large Systems Change

Sandra Waddock, Boston College  2015

Large systems change is arguably needed if the world is to transition from its current unsustainable business-as-usual trajectory toward a socio-political-economic system that creates a sustainable enterprise economy. As the special issue of the Journal of Corporate Citizenship (Issue 58) on Large Systems Change makes clear, such transitions are uncertain and difficult. Further, the collapse of numerous previous human civilizations in the past tells us that system changes are not always in the direction of sustainability. The question we wanted to raise with the special issue is how can we, as participants in the system, begin to bring about change in the direction of sustainability rather than its opposite?

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Call for Papers: A Special Issue of The Journal of Corporate Citizenship on Intellectual Shamans, Wayfinders, Systems Thinkers and Social Movements

JCC 48 coverCall for Papers

The Journal of Corporate Citizenship Special Issue

Intellectual Shamans, Wayfinders, Systems Thinkers and Social Movements:  Building a Future Where All Can Thrive

Guest Editors: Chellie Spiller (Lead Editor), Malcolm McIntosh, Judith Neal, Edwina Pio, Sandra Waddock 

How will we build a future where all can thrive?  That is a question that has always haunted people.  Today, however, we face a particular need for radical global systems change. A key issue is the rampant fundamentalism of neoliberal economics which claims that the market will solve the challenges of climate change, species extinction, inequity, a troubled global financial system, misogyny, nationalism and social unrest.  It will not. The neoliberal endeavor to objectify, commoditise and marketise all aspects of our lives has devalued public goods, social enterprise, quiet moments, awe and wonder from daily living. Continue reading

Call for Papers on ‘Japanese Approaches to CSR’

JCC46 coverThe Journal of Corporate Citizenship is pleased to invite papers for a special issue of the JCC on ‘Japanese Approaches to CSR.’ 

Guest Editor: Prof. Kanji Tanimoto, Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan

Overview of the theme
How is Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) understood and managed in Japanese business, and how is it part of ‘good’ Corporate Governance?

The debate on CSR has grown rapidly and internationally over the last two decades, in both business and academic communities. The current CSR movement has been developed in European and Anglo-American contexts based on principles of the market, industrial, business and social structures. However, CSR has taken root in other countries and areas as well and increasingly in Japan. The Japanese economic system has been traditionally structured by relational trading between firms, relational banking, and a long-term relationship with employees for mutual consideration. It has always been an advantage of the Japanese economy. Now, however, we must explore whether it is a strength or weakness for globalization and in embedding CSR into Japanese corporate society. There is much debate on how to incorporate the concept and philosophy of CSR into the context of different countries. Since the early 2000s there have been a growing number of studies offering alternative perspectives on CSR, deriving from Asia and other regions. We need to examine how CSR management and practical wisdom in organisations works in various countries/regions, rather than simply highlighting the differences amongst regions.
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Is global citizenship about Google, Amazon and Facebook, or is it about aspiration to higher goals?

"Responsible leadership in government, business or civil society is founded on (responsible) global citizenship" - Malcolm McIntosh

“Responsible leadership in government, business or civil society is founded on (responsible) global citizenship” – Malcolm McIntosh

Does the rise of the global citizen mean the demise, or at least the transformation, of the nation-state? Certainly, anyone who has spent any time in China in recent years will tell you that everyone is full of ideas and politics around a table and over a beer, but much more circumspect online: it’s all very Orwellian. And as social media expands into every corner of our lives and into every crack in our brains—in almost all countries—we must wonder if in gaining the world, and therefore giving birth to global citizenship, we are not giving ourselves away to whoever is collecting the ‘big data’ at the supermarket checkout and in the global etherspace.
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Responsible Investment in Emerging Markets: Priorities for Action

"Engaged investors... create long-term value for companies and wider society" - Rory Sullivan.

“Engaged investors… create long-term value for companies and wider society.” – Rory Sullivan

In recent years, investors have argued that “responsible investment” allows investors to maximise the financial and social benefits of their activities, and, simultaneously, to mitigate the negative impacts of their investments. As yet, however, little has been written in the practitioner or in the academic literature about the responsibilities of investors in emerging markets, about the practicalities of implementing responsible investment in emerging markets, or about the outcomes (financial and social) that result.

The latest issue of the Journal of Corporate Citizenship addresses this gap in the literature by presenting a series of major articles that analyse the implications, for investors and for society, of investors seeking to take a more responsible approach to their investments. The articles highlight the potential contribution of foreign investment to economic development and to wider society (e.g. through skills development, local economic development, local employment). They also explain that foreign investment is not unambiguously positive for developing countries, with many such investments being criticised for their negative impacts on local communities and the local environment, for the lack of local benefits and for their volatility.
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Responsible Investment in Emerging Markets: A special JCC issue

JCC 48 coverIn recent years, investors have argued that “responsible investment” allows investors to maximise the financial and social benefits of their activities, and, simultaneously, to mitigate the negative impacts of their investments. As yet, however, little has been written – in either the practitioner or in the academic literature – about the responsibilities of investors in emerging markets, about the practicalities of implementing responsible investment in emerging markets, or about the outcomes (financial and social) that result.

This special issue of the Journal of Corporate Citizenship, edited by Rory Sullivan and Daphne Bilouri, addresses this gap in the literature by presenting a series of major articles that analyse the implications – for investors and for society – of investors seeking to take a more responsible approach to their investments.
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