ARSP as a diversity of perspectives

Following the release of the latest edition of The Annual Review of Social Partnerships (ARSP), Associate Editor, Jill Bogie, discusses the role of multi-stakeholder partnerships in building a more sustainable future.

One of the reasons that ARSP is such a great resource is the diversity of perspectives that it offers and the huge variety of subject areas where cross-sector partnerships (CSPs) are applied. From this variety, one of the notable themes in this year’s issue is multi-stakeholder collaboration. The editors of the Publications Section observe that there is a growing interest in the governance of such arrangements. It is a topic that is covered in each of the five sections of ARSP.

Continue reading

Greenleaf Journal to be included in ABDC Journal Quality List

We are delighted to announce that the journal Business, Peace and Sustainable Development has been ranked by the Australian Business Deans Council in its Journal Quality list as a category C journal.  The ABDC seeks to promote value and excellence in business research across universities, governments and industry throughout Australia and New Zealand. Continue reading

Greenleaf journal on business and peace to feature in new edition of leading science research database

BPSD Editor Debbie Haski-Leventhal

BPSD Editor Debbie Haski-Leventhal, Macquarie Graduate School of Management, speaking at the recent UN Global Compact Business for Peace event in New York.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Greenleaf Publishing journal Business, Peace and Sustainable Development (BPSD) has been selected to appear in a new edition of Thomson Reuters Web of Science research platform, which launches in November this year.

The Emerging Sources Citation Index (ESCI) will extend coverage of content featured in the Web of Science database to include high-quality, peer-reviewed publications of regional importance and in emerging scientific fields. Fully searchable and citable, inclusion in the ESCI will increase the visibility and reach of articles published in the journal.

Continue reading

Memes and Large System Change

Sandra Waddock, Boston College 2015

In 1976 evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins in his book The Selfish Gene invented the term ‘meme,’ to represent the basic unit of cultural information that replicates from one person to another. Dawkins sought a term that resembled the basic building block of life—the gene—for the basic building block of culture—the meme. Memes generate the complex ideas and other units of information that form into complexes, called memeplexes by Susan Blackmore in her book The Meme Machine. Such memeplexes become our belief systems, ideologies, cultures, stories, shared values and norms, and common (or not) understandings, among other things. The core idea of the successful meme is that it transfers from one person to another, like genes, reasonably intact.

Continue reading

Complexity, Collapse and Large Systems Change

Sandra Waddock, Boston College  2015

Large systems change is arguably needed if the world is to transition from its current unsustainable business-as-usual trajectory toward a socio-political-economic system that creates a sustainable enterprise economy. As the special issue of the Journal of Corporate Citizenship (Issue 58) on Large Systems Change makes clear, such transitions are uncertain and difficult. Further, the collapse of numerous previous human civilizations in the past tells us that system changes are not always in the direction of sustainability. The question we wanted to raise with the special issue is how can we, as participants in the system, begin to bring about change in the direction of sustainability rather than its opposite?

Continue reading