Mental Models

Note: this article is part of The Transatlantic Debate Blog series, which forms a conversation between Dr. Katrin Muff and Dr. Kathy Miller Perkins on business sustainability. Read the previous post here.

We live in a complex world fraught with challenges that require large-scale change. Thus all of us need to become change experts who can function at the individual, organizational and societal levels.  These statements echo the themes of Katrin Muff’s blog last month.  I agree with her premises.  Therefore, this month I will build on her idea by examining the importance of mental models to change expertise.  This is a complicated and much discussed topic, and I don’t intend to cover it thoroughly.  I will merely introduce it in this blog and include my arguments as to why it is important for change expertise.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Call for Contributions for Eco-Friendly and Fair: Fast Fashion and Consumer Behavior

Eco-Friendly and Fair:  Fast fashion and consumer behavior

Editors

Carolin Becker-Leifhold, University Ulm (carolin.becker-leifhold@uni-ulm.de)

Mark Heuer, Susquehanna University (heuer@susqu.edu)

Greenleaf Publishing and The Textile Institute invite contributions to a forthcomiti-logo-colour-small-jpegng title, which will address the economic, social, and environmental unsustainability of the fast fashion industry, as well as potential consumer behavior patterns supportive of the emerging eco-fashion industry.  The Textile Institute identifies textiles as the second largest industry in the world. The fast fashion segment is notorious for a supply chain that links low wage, often unsafe and environmentally degraded working conditions with cheap chic, fast fashion Western retailers.

In response to the 2013 Rana Plaza tragedy that resulted in the deaths of over 1,100 garment workers,  this collection will identify how consumer behavior approaches could  shift garment demand toward more sustainable, responsible consumption patterns in the future.  To this end, we seek contributions from academics, practitioners, policymakers, business leaders, journalists and entrepreneurs. 


Continue reading

Why all of us should care about corporate culture

by Dr. Kathy Miller Perkins

Note: this article is part of The Transatlantic Debate Blog series, which forms a conversation between Dr. Katrin Muff and Dr. Kathy Miller Perkins on business sustainability. Read the previous post here.

On September 18, 2015 the Volkswagen Group received a notice of violation from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) of the United States for intentionally programming their diesel engines to activate emissions controls only during laboratory testing.  According to the New York Times, this “diesel deception” could cause hundreds of deaths in the USA alone, due to the tons of pollutants released into the atmosphere.  And an October 28th headline in  the  New York Times proclaimed that “Volkswagen, hit by Emissions Scandal, Posts its First Loss in Years.” Continue reading

Three prestigious organisations sign book series agreements with Greenleaf Publishing

Three major organisations that are producing significant research in the fields of business and environmental sustainability – The Textile Institute; Portland State University; World Association for Sustainable Development – have signed agreements with Greenleaf Publishing to produce future book series.

Continue reading

Boundaries and Borders: Do They Enrich or Imprison Us?

by Dr. Kathy Miller Perkins

Note: this article is part of The Transatlantic Debate Blog series, which forms a conversation between Dr. Katrin Muff and Dr. Kathy Miller Perkins on business sustainability. Read the previous post here.

BLOG

 

 

 

 

 

We live in a world of boundaries – a term that can be defined in many ways:

  • A dividing line.
  • A point or limit that indicates where two things become different.
  • Frontiers inviting exploration and development.

Some boundaries appear on maps as divisions between countries.   Others are physical, such as fences or walls.  In recent years technology has removed many of the boundaries that separated us in the past.  However, internal or psychological boundaries seem to have become more entrenched now than ever before.  And since boundaries of any type can enrich or imprison us, the question I am exploring this month is this:  How can we ensure that the boundaries which frame us are generative rather than limiting?

Continue reading

Closing the Gender Gap

Integrating GenderBy PATRICIA M. FLYNN, KEVIN V. CAVANAGH, AND DIANA BILIMORIA

What business schools can do to increase the number of women in the corporate world.

 

 

This article was originally posted in BizEd, on February 26, 2015: see www.bizedmagazine.com/en/archives/2015/2/features/closing-the-gender-gap

The data in this article is based on research highlighted in “Gender Equality in Business Schools: The Elephant in the Room,” a chapter in the newly published book Integrating Gender Equality into Business and Management Education: Lessons Learned and Challenges Remaining (Greenleaf Publishing). It is part of the Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME)/Greenleaf Publishing book series.

Continue reading

UK launch of Beyond Governments

Beyon Governments_cover-1

Beyond Governments
Making Collective Governance Work – Lessons from the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative

Eddie Rich and Jonas Moberg
June 2015, Greenleaf Publishing

With a Foreword by Clare Short, former Secretary of State for International Development

In a world characterised by globalisation, governments increasingly find themselves unable to govern. Corruption is everywhere, natural resources are being exploited, the environment damaged, markets distorted, and the fight against poverty is often ineffective. Certain challenges cannot be addressed by governments alone. Increasingly, collective governance “beyond governments” is seen as part of the solution, with state and non-state actors working together.

Continue reading