When Values Collide

Note: this article is part of The Transatlantic Debate Blog series, which forms a conversation between Dr. Katrin Muff and Dr. Kathy Miller Perkins on business sustainability. Read the previous post here.

In looking back over the blogs Katrin and I wrote this year, I noted that “change” is a theme connecting most if not all of them. We discussed the urgent need for change, various levels of change, forces that propel change as well as those that hinder it. We examined the need to understand our own change-related assumptions. We offered suggestions for how to become change experts. And last month Katrin described an engagement with a client where she facilitated a change process. All along we have acknowledged that change is difficult. This month I will reflect on how recent change-related challenges have confronted me personally and what I have learned as a result.

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ARSP as a diversity of perspectives

Following the release of the latest edition of The Annual Review of Social Partnerships (ARSP), Associate Editor, Jill Bogie, discusses the role of multi-stakeholder partnerships in building a more sustainable future.

One of the reasons that ARSP is such a great resource is the diversity of perspectives that it offers and the huge variety of subject areas where cross-sector partnerships (CSPs) are applied. From this variety, one of the notable themes in this year’s issue is multi-stakeholder collaboration. The editors of the Publications Section observe that there is a growing interest in the governance of such arrangements. It is a topic that is covered in each of the five sections of ARSP.

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Ahead of the release of his new book Somebody Else’s Problem: Consumerism, Sustainability and Design, Robert Crocker examines the pervasive and destructive impacts of our consumption-driven social and economic systems.

Consumerism today represents an unprecedented crisis of values, in ethical, social and material terms. Never before have so many resources and so much energy been used to produce so many goods for so many people. And never before have hundreds of millions of people across the world been so ingeniously encouraged to buy, use and then throw away or upgrade – with increasing rapidity – what they have bought. This has resulted in a world of unsustainable material flows, and a world drowning in waste.

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Mental Models

Note: this article is part of The Transatlantic Debate Blog series, which forms a conversation between Dr. Katrin Muff and Dr. Kathy Miller Perkins on business sustainability. Read the previous post here.

We live in a complex world fraught with challenges that require large-scale change. Thus all of us need to become change experts who can function at the individual, organizational and societal levels.  These statements echo the themes of Katrin Muff’s blog last month.  I agree with her premises.  Therefore, this month I will build on her idea by examining the importance of mental models to change expertise.  This is a complicated and much discussed topic, and I don’t intend to cover it thoroughly.  I will merely introduce it in this blog and include my arguments as to why it is important for change expertise.

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Green Events and Green Tourism: an international guide to good practice

Edited by Dr Hugues Séraphin and Emma Nolan

Call for Chapters

Definitions and scope

Green Events and Green Tourism: an international guide to good practice will comprise case studies that demonstrate best practice in a range of small to mega events, including sports events, festivals and cultural events, conferences and exhibitions. Case studies may also illustrate best practice in event spaces and venues. In terms of best practice in tourism management, case studies are encouraged that highlight the work done by leading organisations in post-conflict, post-disaster or post-colonial destinations as well as within established or emerging destinations.

Case studies should demonstrate the integration of sustainability and responsibility into strategy, operations and products in order to have a positive transformational impact on the social and environmental challenges we face. Case studies which highlight innovation are particularly welcome.
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Call for Contributions for Eco-Friendly and Fair: Fast Fashion and Consumer Behavior

Eco-Friendly and Fair:  Fast fashion and consumer behavior

Editors

Carolin Becker-Leifhold, University Ulm (carolin.becker-leifhold@uni-ulm.de)

Mark Heuer, Susquehanna University (heuer@susqu.edu)

Greenleaf Publishing and The Textile Institute invite contributions to a forthcomiti-logo-colour-small-jpegng title, which will address the economic, social, and environmental unsustainability of the fast fashion industry, as well as potential consumer behavior patterns supportive of the emerging eco-fashion industry.  The Textile Institute identifies textiles as the second largest industry in the world. The fast fashion segment is notorious for a supply chain that links low wage, often unsafe and environmentally degraded working conditions with cheap chic, fast fashion Western retailers.

In response to the 2013 Rana Plaza tragedy that resulted in the deaths of over 1,100 garment workers,  this collection will identify how consumer behavior approaches could  shift garment demand toward more sustainable, responsible consumption patterns in the future.  To this end, we seek contributions from academics, practitioners, policymakers, business leaders, journalists and entrepreneurs. 


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‘Business as an Instrument for Societal Change: In Conversation with the Dalai Lama’ launches in Brussels

The launch of Business as an Instrument for Societal Change: In Conversation with the Dalai Lama took place on the 10th September at the Power & Care (A Mind & Life Dialogue with His Holiness the Dalai Lama) in Brussels. The author of the book, Sander Tideman, presented a copy to HH the Dalai Lama, who commented:

“Of course, this is very good. We need to bring compassion into business; compassion is the best motivation for any activity in the world. It benefits others as well as yourself, including your business”.

While forthcoming on other humanitarian and environmental issues, the Dalai Lama rarely speaks directly on the topics of business, leadership and economics.

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